Events

Sep
25
Mon
2017
Enigma: Cruise Missiles, Rockets and Superguns @ SHEFFIELD Kelham Island Museum
Sep 25 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

A lecture by Phil Judkins

Sep
26
Tue
2017
AGM + John ‘Longitude’ Harrison – what did he actually achieve? @ MANCHESTER Museum of Science & Industry
Sep 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

John Harrison ClockDoug Bateman debunks the many myths surrounding Harrison and the Longitude Prize. It is well known that John Harrison’s watch was the first to demonstrate that longitude could be determined at sea with the aid of a time-piece. Much has been written about his clocks and the watch, with the emphasis on the ‘story’. However, many writers ignore the importance of other workers and astronomers, and reluctantly mention that Harrison’s watch was completely uneconomic. Doug Bateman outlines the problem of accurate timekeeping and its potential solutions, through to the appearance of the box chronometer. The lecture mentions the Sheffield clockmaker, Benjamin Huntsman, who turned to developing crucible steel; the huge significance of Ramsden and his sextants; and Nevil Maskelyne, the Astronomer Royal, who helped to assess the watch, and pioneered the publication of the Nautical Almanac. The Newcomen North West AGM will take place on the same evening.

Oct
4
Wed
2017
Upminster Windmill and the Boulton & Watt Bell-crank Type ‘Helper’ Engine @ BIRMINGHAM: Thinktank, Birmingham Science Museum
Oct 4 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

A lecture by Chris Hodrien, Bill Whitehead & Colleague

Oct
11
Wed
2017
Luxcrete: an invention that brought daylight to dark Victorian buildings @ LONDON Alan Baxter Gallery
Oct 11 @ 5:45 pm – 7:45 pm

Luxfer 1905 P63A lecture by Ian Edwards. The origins of Luxcrete can be traced back more than 100 years to a British inventor based in the States who patented a product in the 1880s that used refraction of natural light to illuminate dark Victorian buildings. This system  performance was further enhanced by the prominent physics professor and spectroscopist Henry H Crew and leading light engineer Olin H Basquin.  Basquin developed the product by establishing the brightness of the Chicago sky for calculations to design prisms and is still credited with being the first person to record daylight measurements scientifically. The eminent American architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed many of the early prisms used in the system to transfer the daylight. First established in the UK in 1898 under license, the Luxfer British Prism Syndicate (Lux=light fer = to carry) was created and the modern system of borrowed lighting was introduced to Dickensian London. The Edwards family first became involved with Luxfer in the early twentieth century and continued the connection through Cyril and Ian Edwards to Luxcrete. Luxfer developed a large range of products from pavement lights to art and stained glass windows, wartime munitions and a joint venture with Crittall Windows.

Ian Edwards joined Luxcrete in 1969 and gained experience in various departments before being appointed Contracts Manager in 1972 and in 1977 Contracts Director in 1977 and  Managing Director on 1982 and remained in that role until the business was sold in 2008. He acted as a BSI appointed UK delegate to serving on the CEN and ISO working groups drafting product standards.

 

Oct
13
Fri
2017
The Archaeology of Early Steam Steam Locomotives @ NEWCASTLE North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers
Oct 13 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

A lecture by Dr Michael Bailey. This is a joint meeting with SLS at the  Mining Institute, Newcastle upon Tyne beginning 19.00.

Oct
17
Tue
2017
The Deane Brothers and the Diving Helmet @ PORTSMOUTH: Portland Building, Rm PO1-11, University of Portsmouth
Oct 17 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

A lecture by John Bevan

Oct
19
Thu
2017
Who designed the Clifton Suspension Bridge? Fact & Fiction. @ BRISTOL, BAWA
Oct 19 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

A lecture by Julia Elton

Oct
23
Mon
2017
Gun barrels, Muskets to Tanks @ SHEFFIELD Kelham Island Museum
Oct 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

A lecture by Stephen Cater

Oct
24
Tue
2017
The Famous ‘Flying Scotsman’ – Marketing, Circumstance and Chance   @ MANCHESTER Renold Building, University of Manchester
Oct 24 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Bob's photo at NRM croppedA lecture by Bob Gwynne who is an outstanding speaker from the National Railway Museum in York on a topic that needs no introduction. This is a (joint meeting with The Stephenson Locomotive Society. In the UK approximately 110,000 steam locomotives were built, but just one seems to be universally known amongst the British public. Author, curator and Flying Scotsman expert Bob Gwynne will attempt to answer the question as to why ‘Flying Scotsman’ is so famous. Expect unusual images and people stories that cover more than 90 years of ‘marketing, circumstance and chance’ in a lively presentation that will provide some insight as to why the 3rd ‘A1’ locomotive built by the LNER for a specific job, became a ‘UK plc’ brand as familiar as HP sauce and Big Ben.

The Renold Building is entered from Altrincham Street, close to Piccadilly Railway station taxi exit and Tram Stop.  There is a multi-storey car park on Charles Street with a pedestrian exit on Sackville Street which leads to the Renold Building. The Renold Building is the tall white building with the zig-zag front and open glass staircase.

NOTE: There will be a voluntary charge of £4 to defray room hire expenses at the University

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Nov
1
Wed
2017
A History of Mine Transport @ BIRMINGHAM: Thinktank, Birmingham Science Museum
Nov 1 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

A lecture by Dr Tom Elliott

Nov
8
Wed
2017
The SS Great Britain: a fresh image @ LONDON Dana Studio
Nov 8 @ 5:45 pm – 7:45 pm

A lecture by Malcolm Bishop

Nov
14
Tue
2017
The Willington Wagonway @ NEWCASTLE: Tyne&Wear Discovery Museum
Nov 14 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

A lecture by Dominique Bell

Nov
16
Thu
2017
Ropemaking Machinery @ BRISTOL, BAWA
Nov 16 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

A lecture by Edward Sargeant

Nov
21
Tue
2017
Developments in Heavy AA Artillery WW2 @ PORTSMOUTH: Portland Building, Rm PO1-11, University of Portsmouth
Nov 21 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

A lecture by Geoff Smith

Nov
22
Wed
2017
William Fairbairn and the Iron Girder Bridge @ SHEFFIELD Kelham Island Museum
Nov 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

A lecture by Richard Byrom

Nov
28
Tue
2017
A call to ARMs @ MANCHESTER Museum of Science & Industry
Nov 28 @ 6:00 pm – 8:15 pm

A personal account from Professor Stephen Furber,  the developer of the RISC chip used in all your smartphones. This is a joint meeting with The Computer Conservation Society. Please note earlier start time of 6pm

Dec
6
Wed
2017
Two Knights at Pandemonium: the Creighton Brothers at Boulton, Watt & Co c.1800-1820 @ BIRMINGHAM: Thinktank, Birmingham Science Museum
Dec 6 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

A lecture by Professor Jennifer Tann

Dec
13
Wed
2017
Understanding the Gas Industry’s Evolution and Environmental Legacy – using high resolution analysis of gas tars @ LONDON Dana Studio,
Dec 13 @ 5:45 pm – 7:45 pm
Dec
21
Thu
2017
Shipbreaking versus the Law @ PORTSMOUTH: Portland Building,
Dec 21 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

A lecture by Michael Galley

Jan
3
Wed
2018
Locating and Repairing Faults in Submarine Cables in the Victorian Era @ BIRMINGHAM: Thinktank, Birmingham Science Museum
Jan 3 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Jan
10
Wed
2018
Made in Britain: an oral history of British applied science and engineering @ LONDON: The Dana Studio,
Jan 10 @ 5:45 pm – 7:45 pm

A lecture by Dr Sally Horrocks and Dr Tom Lean

Jan
16
Tue
2018
Portable Wireless in the RN @ PORTSMOUTH: Portland Bldg,
Jan 16 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

A lecture by Clive Kidd

Jan
18
Thu
2018
Four short papers @ BRISTOL, BAWA
Jan 18 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

A joint meeting with Bristol Industrial Archaeological Society when four short papers will be given

Jan
22
Mon
2018
History of Gas Manufacture in the UK @ SHEFFIELD Kelham Island Museum
Jan 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

A lecture by Prof. Russell Thomas. This is a joint meeting with the South Yorkshire Industrial History Society

Jan
30
Tue
2018
Stuffed in attic trunks and the minds of aging scientists”? Reflections on Technical History and the History of Technology @ MANCHESTER Museum of Science & Industry
Jan 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

Michael Grace’s Presidential Address examines the value of detailed technical history and its status

Feb
7
Wed
2018
Plastics – their origins and development from Parkesine to Bakelite @ BIRMINGHAM: Thinktank, Birmingham Science Museum
Feb 7 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

A lecture by Dr Susan Mossman

Feb
14
Wed
2018
The Development of the Engineering Drawing Office @ LONDON: The Dana Studio,
Feb 14 @ 5:45 pm – 7:45 pm
Feb
15
Thu
2018
Stuffed in attic trunks and the minds of aging scientists @ BRISTOL, BAWA
Feb 15 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Michael  Grace’s Presidential Address. Stuffed in attic trunks and the minds of aging scientists? Reflections on Technical History and the History of Technology

It is widely accepted that the world as we know it today can only be understood by reference to technology and its history.  However, it is the impacts and consequences of technologies, rather than their inherent technical development, that provides that understanding. As technologies have become more science-based and complex, it is increasingly difficult for those without specialist knowledge to fully understand and appreciate how these technologies work, how they arose and how they were developed. Whilst the benefits of studying the history of technology as a factor in understanding social, economic and political history is more or less self-evident, the benefits of studying the fundamental underlying technical history is less so.  For example, to what extent do historians need to understand the technical development of aviation in order to understand and appreciate the social impacts of air travel in the second half of the twentieth century? The lecture will consider the value of studying detailed technical history and the ‘amateur and recreational’ status sometimes accorded to such study, together with other related topics, in the context of the Newcomen Society.

Feb
20
Tue
2018
Dirty but Necessary: South Hampshire and the Seaborne Coal Trade l700-1850 @ PORTSMOUTH: Portland Bldg, Rm PO1-11
Feb 20 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

A lecture by James Thomas

Feb
26
Mon
2018
Brunel’s Fan @ SHEFFIELD Kelham Island Museum
Feb 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:15 pm

A lecture by Michael Bailey. This is a joint meeting with the Stephenson Locomotive Society

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       Newcomen Links 243, the September issue, has been published. The next issue of the International Journal for the History of Engineering and Technology will also be published this month.  

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